Journal of Minimal Access Surgery

REVIEW ARTICLE
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Year : 2015  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 223--230

Residual gallbladder stones after cholecystectomy: A literature review

Pradeep Chowbey, Anil Sharma, Amit Goswami, Yusuf Afaque, Khoobsurat Najma, Manish Baijal, Vandana Soni, Rajesh Khullar 
 Max Institute of Minimal Access, Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, Max Superspeciality Hospital, Saket, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Anil Sharma
Max Institute of Minimal Access, Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, Max Superspecialty Hospital, 1-2, Press Enclave Road, Saket, New Delhi - 110 017
India

Background: Incomplete gallbladder removal following open and laparoscopic techniques leads to residual gallbladder stones. The commonest presentation is abdominal pain, dyspepsia and jaundice. We reviewed the literature to report diagnostic modalities, management options and outcomes in patients with residual gallbladder stones after cholecystectomy. Materials And Methods: Medline, Google and Cochrane library between 1993 and 2013 were reviewed using search terms residual gallstones, post-cholecystectomy syndrome, retained gallbladder stones, gallbladder remnant, cystic duct remnant and subtotal cholecystectomy. Bibliographical references from selected articles were also analyzed. The parameters that were assessed include demographics, time of detection, clinical presentation, mode of diagnosis, nature of intervention, site of stone, surgical findings, procedure performed, complete stone clearance, sequelae and follow-up. Results: Out of 83 articles that were retrieved between 1993 and 2013, 22 met the inclusion criteria. In most series, primary diagnosis was established by ultrasound/computed tomography scan. Localization of calculi and delineation of biliary tract was performed using magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In few series, diagnosis was established by endoscopic ultrasound, intraoperative cholangiogram and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Laparoscopic surgery, endoscopic techniques and open surgery were the most common treatment modalities. The most common sites of residual gallstones were gallbladder remnant, cystic duct remnant and common bile duct. Conclusion: Residual gallbladder stones following incomplete gallbladder removal is an important sequelae after cholecystectomy. Completion cholecystectomy (open or laparoscopic) is the most common treatment modality reported in the literature for the management of residual gallbladder stones.


How to cite this article:
Chowbey P, Sharma A, Goswami A, Afaque Y, Najma K, Baijal M, Soni V, Khullar R. Residual gallbladder stones after cholecystectomy: A literature review.J Min Access Surg 2015;11:223-230


How to cite this URL:
Chowbey P, Sharma A, Goswami A, Afaque Y, Najma K, Baijal M, Soni V, Khullar R. Residual gallbladder stones after cholecystectomy: A literature review. J Min Access Surg [serial online] 2015 [cited 2021 Sep 17 ];11:223-230
Available from: https://www.journalofmas.com/article.asp?issn=0972-9941;year=2015;volume=11;issue=4;spage=223;epage=230;aulast=Chowbey;type=0