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 UNUSUAL CASE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 385-388

Pneumothorax as a rare complication during laparoscopic total extra-peritoneal inguinal hernia repair: A case report and review of the literature


1 3rd Department of Surgery, Medical School, Attikon University Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
2 1st Department of Surgery, Medical School, Laikon General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Dimitrios Papaconstantinou
3rd Department of Surgery, Medical School, Attikon University Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Rimini Street 1, 12462, Athens
Greece
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jmas.JMAS_34_21

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Totally extra-peritoneal (TEP) and trans-abdominal pre-peritoneal repair are the two most commonly performed types of laparoscopic hernia repair procedures. Herein, we present a rare case of pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum that ensued during a TEP inguinal hernia repair. A 73-year-old man presented for elective laparoscopic right-sided hernia repair. After intubation, a 10-mm and two 5-mm trocars were placed in the peri-umbilical and midline area, respectively. A balloon dissector was inserted from the 10-mm trocar to develop the retro-rectus space and carbon dioxide was insufflated up to a pressure of 14 mmHg. About 55 min after insufflation, the patient presented subcutaneous emphysema, oxygen saturation dropped from 100% to 96% and pCO2 increased to 55 mmHg. Due to concerns for pulmonary embolism, he immediately underwent a chest computed tomography, which revealed pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema extended throughout the neck, thorax and upper abdomen. The patient was successfully treated conservatively with oral analgesia and supplemental oxygen and was discharged on the 4th post-operative day without any further complications.






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