Users Online : 2360 About us |  Subscribe |  e-Alerts  | Feedback | Login   
Journal of Minimal Access Surgery Current Issue | Archives | Ahead Of Print Journal of Minimal Access Surgery
           Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size 
 ¤   Next article
 ¤   Previous article
 ¤   Table of Contents

 ¤   Similar in PUBMED
 ¤  Search Pubmed for
 ¤  Search in Google Scholar for
 ¤Related articles
 ¤   Citation Manager
 ¤   Access Statistics
 ¤   Reader Comments
 ¤   Email Alert *
 ¤   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed486    
    Printed13    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded17    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 

 UNUSUAL CASE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 379-381

Refractory lymphatic ascites following laparoscopic management of renal lymphangiectasia: An unusual presentation


Department of Urology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Sumit Saini
Department of Urology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, 5030, Teaching Block, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi - 110 029
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jmas.JMAS_306_20

Rights and Permissions

Renal lymphangiectasia characterised by either unilocular or multilocular cystic lesion in and around the kidney is an uncommon condition. Presentation of these lesions is quite varied, which along with its uncommon occurrence adds to the challenges in the management of this condition. Most of these cases are managed conservatively and very rarely need any intervention. We present an unusual complication of refractory lymphatic ascites following laparoscopic deroofing of a unilocular renal lymphangiectasia in a 21-year-old gentleman who presented with left flank pain. The ascitic fluid analysis suggested non-chylous lymphatic ascites. The surgical outcome was rather exasperating for the patient than the disease itself. Hence, in the interest of the patient with minimal symptoms, if the imaging is highly suggestive of renal lymphangiectasia, either no intervention or the least invasive procedures should be attempted, whenever possible.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

© 2004 Journal of Minimal Access Surgery
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Online since 15th August '04