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 UNUSUAL CASE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 418-420

Laparoscopic retrieval of a fishbone migrating from the stomach causing a liver abscess: Report of case and literature review


Division of General Surgery, Rambam Health Care Campus, The Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Offir Ben-Ishay
Division of General Surgery, Rambam Health Care Campus, 8 Ha'Aliyah Street, Haifa 35254
Israel
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jmas.JMAS_196_19

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Ingestion of foreign bodies (FBs) is a common misfortune worldwide. Fishbone migration from the gastrointestinal tract into the liver is an unusual cause of liver abscess. We present a 66-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with epigastric pain, with no other relevant anamnestic details. Computed tomography scan revealed a liver abscess, secondary to stomach perforation from a long, sharp object. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed a fishbone protruding from the left lobe of the liver. The FB was extracted and the liver abscess incised and drained laparoscopically with no operative and post-operative complications. Migration of FB into the liver is a rare occurrence. Treatment of such liver abscess must include the extraction of the FB. Laparoscopy in these cases is feasible and safe and may prevent unnecessary exploratory laparotomy.






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