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 Table of Contents     
INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENTS
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 219-220
 

Use your phone to build a simple laparoscopic trainer


1 Foundation Doctor, Oxford University Hospitals Trust, Oxford, United Kingdom
2 Core surgical trainee, Wycombe General Hospital, High Wycombe, United Kingdom

Date of Submission20-Jul-2013
Date of Acceptance29-Jul-2013
Date of Web Publication23-Sep-2014

Correspondence Address:
B H van Duren
Oxford Orthopaedic Engineering Centre (OOEC), Botnar Research Centre, NDORMS, University of Oxford, Windmill Road, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7LD
United Kingdom
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-9941.141534

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 ¤ Abstract 

Simulation is becoming increasingly integral to surgical training with progressive restrictions on working hours. This paper describes a unique, cable free, laparoscopic trainer that can be constructed using items readily available to the average surgical trainee. The trainer described is not a substitute for surgical practice but, nonetheless, a useful tool in developing skills such as hand-eye co-ordination, triangulation and depth queuing.


Keywords: Cable free, home built, laparoscopic trainer, simple, surgical training


How to cite this article:
van Duren B H, van Boxel G I. Use your phone to build a simple laparoscopic trainer . J Min Access Surg 2014;10:219-20

How to cite this URL:
van Duren B H, van Boxel G I. Use your phone to build a simple laparoscopic trainer . J Min Access Surg [serial online] 2014 [cited 2020 Oct 23];10:219-20. Available from: https://www.journalofmas.com/text.asp?2014/10/4/219/141534


Simulation has become an integral part of surgical training as it provides a safe method of acquiring core, transferable skills at a time where restrictions in working hours may limit exposure. Laparoscopic trainers are an example of a successful adjunct in developing skills such as hand-eye co-ordination, triangulation and depth queuing. Commercial laparoscopic trainers are expensive, making them unattainable to most trainees. Inexpensive, home-made laparoscopic trainers have previously been described [1],[2] but these require the purchase of a webcam and the use of cables. Here, we describe a unique, cable free, laparoscopic trainer that can be constructed using items readily available to the average surgical trainee at no additional cost.

Four items are required: A smart phone, a tablet computer, a torch and a box. We used an iPhone 5, an iPad mini, a Petzl headlamp and a cardboard box. Step 1: Modify the box to create a bevelled surface to hold the smart phone [Figure 1]. Cut a hole for the smart phone camera. Place the torch inside the box. Step 2: Download/install an application to the phone and tablet allowing the phone camera to act as a remote camera (we used WiFi Camera). Step 3: Obtain laparoscopic tools (out-of-date equipment are often available) and the trainer is ready [Figure 2]. Many variations of the above can be constructed depending on type of smart phone, tablet computer and software available to the surgical trainee. Additionally, a conventional laptop or desktop can be used provided WiFi capability.
Figure 1: Drawing showing box template, dimensions (in centimetres) and fold lines (a-e) 40 prior to and after assembly

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Figure 2: Illustration showing the completed box trainer in use (stacking dice) with additional images of the screen from the perspective of the operating surgeon performing a matchstick exercise and a knot tying exercise

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The trainer described is simple, can be constructed in 15 minutes, with equipment often readily available. This is not a substitute for surgical practice but, nonetheless, a useful tool in developing laparoscopic skills.



 
 ¤ References Top

1.Raptis DA, Mouzaki K, Gore DM. DIY laparoscopic kit. Ann R Coll Surg Engl 2008;90:167-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Dennis R. A simple and cheap home built laparoscopic trainer. J Min Access Surg 2008;3:88.  Back to cited text no. 2
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

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