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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 222-226

Laparoscopic liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic patients. Feasibility of nonanatomic resection in difficult tumor locations


Department of General and Transplant Surgery, Advanced Laparoscopy Unit, St. Martino Hospital, University of Genoa, Italy

Correspondence Address:
Marco Casaccia
Department of General and Transplant Surgery, St. Martino Hospital, University of Genoa, Italy; Largo Rosanna Benzi n° 10, 16132 - Genova, Italia

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-9941.85644

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Background: Surgical resection for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients remains controversial because of high morbidity and recurrence rates. Laparoscopic resection of liver tumors has recently been developed and could reduce morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively our results for laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) for HCC including lesions in the posterosuperior segments of the liver in terms of feasibility, outcome, recurrence and survival. Materials and Methods: Between June 2005 and February 2009, we performed 20 LLR for HCC. Median age of the patients was 66 years. The underlying cirrhosis was staged as Child A in 17 cases and Child B in 3. Results: LLR included anatomic resection in six cases and nonanatomic resection in 14. Eleven procedures were associated in nine (45%) patients. Median tumor size and surgical margins were 3.1 cm and 15 mm, respectively. A conversion to laparotomy occurred in one (5%) patient for hemorrhage. Mortality and morbidity rates were 0% and 15% (3/20). Median hospital stay was 8 days (range: 5-16 days). Over a mean follow-up period of 26 months (range: 19-62 months), 10 (50%) patients presented recurrence, mainly at distance from the surgical site. Treatment of recurrence was possible in all the patients, including orthotopic liver transplantation in three cases. Conclusions: LLR for HCC in selected patients is a safe procedure with good short-term results. It can also be proposed in tumor locations with a difficult surgical access maintaining a low morbidity rate and good oncological adequacy. This approach could have an impact on the therapeutic strategy of HCC complicating cirrhosis as a treatment with curative intent or as a bridge to liver transplantation.






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