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 GI SURGERY
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 52-60

Minimal invasive single-site surgery in colorectal procedures: Current state of the art


1 Department of Surgery, IRCAD/EITS, Hôpitaux Universitaires, 1 Place de l'Hôpital, 67091, Strasbourg Cedex, France
2 Department of Surgery, Radcliffe Hospitals, Oxford, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Joel Leroy
Department of Surgery, IRCAD/EITS, Hôpitaux Universitaires, 1 Place de l'Hôpital, 67091 Strasbourg Cedex
France
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-9941.72382

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Background: Minimally invasive single-site (MISS) surgery has recently been applied to colorectal surgery. We aimed to assess the current state of the art and the adequacy of preliminary oncological results. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature using Pubmed, Medline, SCOPUS and Web of Science databases. Keywords used were "Single Port" or "Single-Incision" or "LaparoEndoscopic Single Site" or "SILS™" and "Colon" or "Colorectal" and "Surgery". Results: Twenty-nine articles on colorectal MISS surgery have been published from July 2008 to July 2010, presenting data on 149 patients. One study reported analgesic requirement. The final incision length ranged from 2.5 to 8 cm. Only two studies reported fascial incision length. There were two port site hernias in a series of 13 patients (15.38%). Two "fully laparoscopic" MISS procedures with preparation and achievement of the anastomosis completely intracorporeally are reported. Future site of ileostomy was used as the sole access for the procedures in three studies. Lymph node harvesting, resection margins and length of specimen were sufficient in oncological cases. Conclusions: MISS colorectal surgery is a challenging procedure that seems to be safe and feasible, but the existing clinical evidence is limited. In selected cases, and especially when an ileostomy is planned, colorectal surgery may be an ideal indication for MISS surgery leading to a no-scar surgery. Despite preliminary oncological results showing the feasibility of MISS surgery, we want to stress the need to standardize the technique and carefully evaluate its application in oncosurgery under ethical committee control.






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