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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 256-260

Hand-assisted laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis


Department of Colorectal Surgery, Second Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University, Suzhou, P.R. China

Correspondence Address:
Chungen Xing
Department of Colorectal Surgery, Second Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University, 1055 Sanxiang Road, Suzhou 215000
P.R. China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jmas.JMAS_230_16

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Introduction: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of undergoing restorative proctocolectomy through ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (RPC-IPAA) with hand-assisted laparoscopic (HALS) in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Patients and Methods: We reviewed 40 consecutive patients who underwent RPC-IPAA with HALS or open technique for treatment of UC between 2010 and 2013. Moreover, the intra-/post-operative outcomes were compared. Results: We found the median operative time was significantly longer in the HALS group while the blood loss was significantly less in patients with HALS than with open surgery. In the HALS group, the median duration of bed rest and the length of hospital stay were significantly shorter. Moreover, the rate of early post-operative complications in the HALS group was significantly less than that in the open surgery group, among which one patient died in the 30th day after surgery for the extensive use of steroids before the operation. Conclusion: These findings clearly show that HALS RPC is safe and less invasiveness. HALS can become a more comfortable and standardised procedure for UC with the adoption of evolving technologies.






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