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 UNUSUAL CASE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 271-272

Recurrent intussusception in a gastric bypass patient with incidental Meckel's diverticulum: A case report


Department of Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY 10065, USA

Correspondence Address:
Cheguevera Afaneh
Department of Surgery, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, 525 East 68th Street, Box 294, New York, NY 10065
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-9941.158158

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Most cases of intussusception in adults are secondary to a pathologic condition that serves as a lead point. Intussusception has been reported in the bariatric literature, typically due to intussusception of the jejunojejunostomy. However, other causes of intussusception should be considered, including a Meckel's diverticulum (MD). Simple diverticulectomy or segmental resection is the preferred treatment since the malignancy rate is low. We present an interesting case of a patient with past surgical history of open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass who presented with intussusception. Intraoperatively, an MD was encountered and treated with diverticulectomy. 4 months later, she re-presented with recurrent intussusception and was subsequently taken back to the operating room for revision of her jejunojejunostomy. The postoperative course was uncomplicated.






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