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 UNUSUAL CASE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 203-204

Achalasia 5 years following Roux-en-y gastric bypass


1 Department of Surgery, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA
2 Department of Pediatrics, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, TX, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mehyar Hefazi Torghabeh
Department of Surgery, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, 525 E 68th Street, New York 10065
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-9941.159854

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Oesophageal achalasia is a rare, but serious condition in which the motility of the lower oesophageal sphincter (LES) is inhibited. This disorder of idiopathic aetiology complicates the peristaltic function and relaxation of the LES that may cause symptoms such as dysphagia, epigastric pain, and regurgitation of an obstructed food. The following case describes achalasia in a patient 5 years following a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). The patient underwent a laparoscopic Heller myotomy without a fundoplication. Although achalasia seems to be a rare occurrence in obese patients, this is the third case documented in a patient who previously had an RYGB. The role of performing a fundoplication in these patients remains to be elucidated.






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