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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 80-83

Indian Experience of Robotics in Gynecology


Department of Minimal access surgery, Galaxy Care Laparoscopy Institute, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Shailesh P Puntambekar
Galaxy Care Laparoscopy Institute, Pune, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-9941.129957

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Aims: To study the role of robotics in various gynaecological cases, benign and malignant. Materials and Methods: A total number of 80 cases have been analyzed. Operative time, estimated blood loss, hospital stay, complications, conversion rates have been retrospectively studied in all cases. Nodal yield, vaginal margin and paracervical clearance have been studied in all malignant cases. This investigation was conducted at a single minimal access surgery institute. Results: Of total 80 cases, 29 were benign and 51 were malignant cases. In benign cases, total robotic hysterectomies were 24, 2 cases of tubotuboplasty, 1 case of endometriotic cyst excision, 1 case of metroplasty and 1 case of rectovaginal fistula. In 51 cases, 37 of radical hysterectomy, 9 exenterations and 6 were parametrectomy. In benign cases, mean operative time was 80 min, estimated blood loss was 20 ml, mean hospital stay was for 1 day, no major complications and no conversions. In malignant cases, mean operative time was 122 min, estimated blood loss was 50-100ml, 2 cases of ureteric fistulas and no conversions, nodal yield was 30, vaginal margin was 2.5-3.8 cm and para cervical clearance was 3-3.5 cm. Conclusions: Ours is the largest series of robotic surgery in gynecological procedures in India. Benign and malignant cases were addressed robotically showing the feasibility.






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