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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 7-12

Single port laparoscopic repair of paediatric inguinal hernias: Our experience at a secondary care centre


Department of Surgery, Air Force Hospital, Kanpur Cantt, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Ameet Kumar
Department of GI Surgery, Teaching Block Room No. 1005, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-9941.107126

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Background: Congenital inguinal hernias are a common paediatric surgical problem and herniotomy through a groin incision is the gold standard. Over the last 2 decades minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has challenged this conventional surgery. Over a period, MIS techniques have evolved to making it more minimally invasive - from 3 to 2 and now single port technique. All studies using single port technique are from tertiary care centres. We used a modification of the technique described by Ozgediz et al. and reviewed the clinical outcome of this novel procedure and put forth our experience at a secondary level hospital. Materials and Methods: Prospective review of 37 hernias in 31 children (29 male and 2 female) (8 months - 13 years) performed laparoscopically by a single surgeon at a single centre between September 2007 and June 2010. Under laparoscopic guidance, the internal ring was encircled extraperitoneally using a 2-0 non-absorbable suture and knotted extraperitoneally. Data analyzed included operating time, ease of procedure, occult patent processus vaginalis (PPV), complications, and cosmesis. Results: Sixteen right (52%), 14 left (45%) and 1 bilateral hernia (3%) were repaired. Five unilateral hernias (16.66%), all left, had a contralateral PPV that was repaired (P = 0.033). Mean operative time for a unilateral and bilateral repair were 13.20 (8-25) and 20.66 min (17 -27 min) respectively. Only one of the repairs (2.7%) recurred and another had a post operative hydrocoele (2.7%). One case (2.7%) needed an additional port placement due to inability to reduce the contents of hernia completely. There were no stitch abscess/granulomas, obvious spermatic cord injuries, testicular atrophy, or nerve injuries. Conclusion: Single port laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair can be safely done in the paediatric population. It permits extension of benefits of minimal access surgery to patients being managed at secondary level hospitals with limited resources. The advantage of minimal instrumentation and avoidance of intracorporeal knotting makes it a feasible technique for a secondary care centre.






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