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 SOLID ORGAN SURGERY
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 68-70

Single-incision laparoscopic splenectomy with innovative gastric traction suture


Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Manipal Institute of Liver and Digestive Diseases, Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, India

Correspondence Address:
G Srikanth
Manipal Institute of Liver and Digestive Diseases, Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka - 560 017
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-9941.72386

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Laparoscopic splenectomy is now the gold standard for patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) undergoing splenectomy. There are a few reports in literature on single-incision laparoscopic (SIL) splenectomy. Herein, we describe a patient undergoing SIL splenectomy for ITP without the use of a disposable port device. We report a 20-year-old female patient with steroid-refractory ITP having a platelet count of 14,000/cmm who underwent a SIL splenectomy. Dissection was facilitated by the use of a single articulating grasper and a gastric traction suture and splenic vessels were secured at the hilum with an endo-GIA stapler. She made an uneventful postoperative recovery and was discharged on the second postoperative day. She is doing well with no visible scar at 8-month follow-up.






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