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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 63-66

Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma


1 Department of Surgery, Thoracic Surgery and Trauma, Surgical Director, Women's Guild Lung Institute, Program Director, General Thoracic Surgery Fellowship, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA
2 Medical Director, Thoracic Surgery and Trauma, Surgical Director, Women's Guild Lung Institute, Program Director, General Thoracic Surgery Fellowship, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA

Correspondence Address:
D R Margulies
Trauma Services and Surgical Critical Care Unit, Associate Director, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd, Suite - 8215, Los Angeles, California - 90048
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-9941.58499

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Background: The role of video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) is still being defined in the management of thoracic trauma. We report our trauma cases managed by VATS and review the role of VATS in the management of thoracic trauma. Materials and Methods: All the trauma patients who underwent VATS from 2000 to 2007 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Results: Twenty-three trauma patients underwent 25 cases of VATS. The most common indication for VATS was retained haemothorax. Thoracotomy was avoided in 21 patients. VATS failed in two cases. On an average VATS was performed on trauma day seven (range 1-26) and the length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 3-58). There was no mortality. VATS was performed in an emergency (day 1-2), or in the early (day 2-7) or late (after day 7) phases of trauma. Conclusion: VATS can be performed safely for the management of thoracic traumas. VATS can be performed before or after thoracotomy and at any stage of trauma. The use of VATS in trauma has a trimodal distribution (emergent, early, late), each with different indications.






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Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
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