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 UNUSUAL CASE
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 104-107

Recurrent achalasia after Heller-Toupet procedure: Laparoscopic extended redo heller myotomy and floppy Dor


Department of Surgery, Sultan Qaboos Hospital, P.O. Box: 98, Salalah, 211, Sultanate of Oman

Correspondence Address:
Vishwanath Golash
Sultan Qaboos Hospital, P. O. Box: 98, Salalah, 211, Sultanate of Oman

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-9941.37193

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Recurrences of symptoms after the surgery for achalasia cardia are not uncommon. There are several causes of recurrences but the early recurrences are speculated to be secondary to incomplete myotomy and late recurrence due to fibrosis after the myotomy or megaesophagus. These recurrences can be managed by regular dilation failing which a redo surgery is indicated. Laparoscopic approach is now standard because of the obvious benefits for patients and surgeons. Extent of myotomy and addition of fundoplication are debatable issue in the management of achalasia cardia but evidence suggests that some kind of fundoplication would be necessary after the complete division of lower esophageal sphincter. We present our experience in a case of recurrent achalasia, secondary to incomplete myotomy managed laparoscopically by extended myotomy and a floppy anterior fundoplication. Patient is asymptomatic six months after the surgery and radiologically there is free passage of barium in the stomach.






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